« A Theological Judgment on Benedict XVI's Negotiations with the SSPX | Main | A Church Historian's Judgment on the Williamson Affair »

April 09, 2009

Comments

evagrius

Having read the entire article, it seems to me fairly clear that the SSPX affair has some relevance.

Lefebvre did not like democracy, denouncing Vatican II as an extension of the French Revolution, (by extension, I would presume that the American Revolution was to be similarly denounced).

It seems to me that there is a rather powerful, or rather "wannabe powerful" group in the Vatican that seeks to return the Church to a pre-democratic, pre-modern, state. I don't think the group will be ultimately successful.

I would have been interested in the author's opinion of the Justinian Code. This Code seems to be what the "wannabe powerful" group wishes to have promulgated.

cor ad cor loquitur

This looks like one of the more important articles to emerge from the debate of the last few years.

It is unfortunate that it is buried within a relatively obscure academic journal: accessible to academics whose institutions happen to subscribe to to Project MUSE but not otherwise except by paying US $15 for a total of two days' access!

I wonder if Aidan O'Neill could be encouraged to give permission for Joseph to post the whole of the piece on his blog? From what I can see it is important thinking and deserves a wider viewing.

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been posted. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Your Information

(Name is required. Email address will not be displayed with the comment.)

Pages

Blog powered by Typepad