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October 29, 2011

Comments

Brian

you might find this article illuminating:
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/05/us/life-sentence-for-possession-of-child-pornography-spurs-debate.html?src=rechp&gwh=D35220B79835816AE62D75627D7F01BD

Spirit of Vatican II

Yes, Brian, it illuminates the witch hunt mentality very well.

shane

Joseph, I find myself violently disagreeing with virtually everything you post but your fluency with the English language is bedazzling, and makes digestible an otherwise unpalatable worldview. Well done!

Incidentally, I regularly read the ultra-reactionary Anglican 'Cranmer' blog for the same reason: like you, he is wrong 99% of the time, but the Victorian prose is irresistible. I commend it to your attention: http://archbishop-cranmer.blogspot.com

Spirit of Vatican II

The movie with Glenn Close is a very interesting one. It gives individual story lines to the secondary characters, turning the short story into a novel, apparently in an effort to rival the polyphony of John Huston's movie "The Dead". The fantastical character of the story proved less of a barrier than I expected. The relationship between the second cross-dressing character and his wife, and at the end with Helen Dawes (abandoned by the dashing rogue Joe Mackins), did not strain credulity.

Moore was an influence on Joyce (the short stories on "Dubliners" and "Confessions of a Young Man" on "Portrait") but there was a ricochet -- "Albert Nobbs", written 4 years after the publication of "Dubliners", owes something to "The Dead", the one story in the collection that Moore thought worth reading, and "The Lake" in its beautiful 1921 revision owes something to the artistic principles of "Portrait".

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